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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

5 edition of The mammalian carotid body found in the catalog.

The mammalian carotid body

D. J. Pallot

The mammalian carotid body

by D. J. Pallot

  • 312 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Springer-Verlag in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Carotid body.,
  • Mammals -- Physiology.,
  • Carotid Body.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDavid J. Pallot.
    SeriesAdvances in anatomy, embryology, and cell biology ;, vol. 102, Advances in anatomy, embryology, and cell biology ;, v. 102.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL801 .E67 vol. 102, QP368.8 .E67 vol. 102
    The Physical Object
    Paginationvi, 91 p. :
    Number of Pages91
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2375997M
    ISBN 10038717480X
    LC Control Number87004290

    The mammalian carotid body (CB) is the primary arterial chemoreceptor that responds to acute hypoxia, initiating systemic protective reflex responses that act to maintain O 2 delivery to the brain and vital organs. The CB is unique in that it is stimulated at O 2 levels above those that begin to impact on the metabolism of most other cell by: 2. Low pO2 selectively inhibits K channel activity in chemoreceptor cells of the mammalian carotid body. J López-López Departamento de Fisiologia y Biofisica, Facultad de Cited by:

    Ionic currents of enzymatically dispersed type I and type II cells of the carotid body have been studied using the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. Type II cells only have a tiny, slowly activating outward potassium current. CAROTID BODY The carotid body consists of two types of cells, that is, glo-mus cells and sustentacular cells. Schwann cells and numerous nerve fibers are also distributed in and around the organ. Glomus cells expressing neuronal and neuroen-docrine markers are Author: Yoko Kameda.

    Ionic currents of enzymatically dispersed type I and type II cells of the carotid body have been studied using the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. Type II cells only have a tiny, slowly activating outward potassium by:   The heart is a complex muscle that pumps blood through the three divisions of the circulatory system: the coronary (vessels that serve the heart), pulmonary (heart and lungs), and systemic (systems of the body), as shown in Figure Coronary circulation intrinsic to the heart takes blood directly from the main artery (aorta) coming from the : Charles Molnar, Jane Gair, Molnar, Charles, Gair, Jane.


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The mammalian carotid body by D. J. Pallot Download PDF EPUB FB2

1 Introduction.- 2 Ultrastructure of the Carotid Body.- Type I Cells.- Sub-types of Type I Cells.- Type II Cells.- Ganglion Cells.- Blood Vessels.- 3 Innervation of the Carotid Body.- Ultrastructure of Nerve Endings.- Clear-Cored Vesicles.- Mitochondria.- Electron Dense-Cored Vesicles.- Glycogen Granules.- Varieties of Type I Cell Endings.- 4 Catecholamines and the.

According to Valentin () and Luschka (), the first description of the structure now known as the carotid body must be ascribed to a Swiss physiolo­ gist - Albrecht von Haller - who, incalled it the ganglion exiguum. This claim, however, may be erroneous, for Tauber () described a.

The Mammalian Carotid Body. [D J Pallot] -- According to Valentin () and Luschka (), the first description of the structure now known as the carotid body must be ascribed to a Swiss physiolo gist - Albrecht von Haller - who, in   The Mammalian Carotid Body.

por David J. Pallot. Advances in Anatomy, Embryology and Cell Biology (Book ) ¡Gracias por compartir. Has enviado la siguiente calificación y reseña. Lo publicaremos en nuestro sitio después de haberla : Springer Berlin Heidelberg. The Mammalian Carotid Body. Coupland RE.

Journal of Anatomy, 01 AugPMCID: PMC Review Free to read. Share this article Share with email Share with twitter Share with linkedin Share with facebook. Abstract. No abstract provided. Free full text. J Anat. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): g (external link)Author: R.

Coupland. About this book Introduction According to Valentin () and Luschka (), the first description of the structure now known as the carotid body must be ascribed to a Swiss physiolo­ gist - Albrecht von Haller - who, incalled it the ganglion exiguum.

or no adaptation to hypoxia makes the carotid body a unique sensory receptor for monitoring changes in the arterial blood P O 2. Site(s) of O 2 sensing in the carotid body The chemoreceptor tissue is composed of two cell types: type I and type II. Type I cells (also called glomus cells) are of neural crest origin and express a variety of by:   The carotid body primordium forms in the wall of the third arch artery at E in mouse embryos.

1 At E, the primordium is located adjacent to the upper portion of the common carotid artery, that is, in the carotid artery bifurcation and always in contact with the SCG (Figure 1).Author: Yoko Kameda.

Cite this chapter as: Pallot D.J. () Carotid Body Pathology. In: The Mammalian Carotid Body. Advances in Anatomy Embryology and Cell Biology, vol Author: David J. Pallot. Physiological Plasticity of Neural-Crest-Derived Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Carotid Body Valentina Annese,1,* Elena Navarro-Guerrero,1 Ismael Rodrı´guez-Prieto,1 and Ricardo Pardal1,2,* 1Departamento de Fisiologı ´aMedica y Biofı´sica, Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBiS), Hospital Universitario Virgen del.

This chapter discusses the mechanisms of chemotransmission in the mammalian carotid body. The carotid bodies are small-paired organs located near the bifurcations of the common carotid arteries; they lie in variable anatomical relationship with these vessels in different animal by: The carotid body is a small cluster of chemoreceptor cells, and supporting sustentacular carotid body is located in the adventitia, in the bifurcation (fork) of the common carotid artery, which runs along both sides of the neck.

The carotid body detects changes in the composition of arterial blood flowing through it, mainly the partial pressure of arterial oxygen, but also of carbon MeSH: D For a while the carotid body remained forgotten, to be rediscovered in by Mayer of Bonn who again remarked upon the branches of the sympathetic, glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves as sources of a nerve plexus which innervated the ganglion : Springer Berlin Heidelberg.

Glia-like Stem Cells Sustain Physiologic Neurogenesis in the Adult Mammalian Carotid Body Ricardo Pardal,1 Patricia Ortega-Sa ´enz,1 Rocıo Duran,1 and Jose´ Lo´pez-Barneo1,* 1Laboratorio de Investigaciones Biome´dicas, Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocı´o, Universidad de Sevilla, Avenida Manuel Siurot s/n, SevillaSpain *Correspondence: [email protected] Carotid body, a highly vascular tissue receives afferent innervation from the carotid sinus nerve, which is a branch of the glossopharyngeal nerve.

The chemoreceptor tissue is primarily composed of type I (also called glomus cells) and type II cells (also called sustentacular cells) along with vascular endothelial cells and few ganglion cells. The carotid body is an arterial chemoreceptor organ sensitive to blood levels of O 2, CO 2 and pH.

The present immunocytochemical and neurochemical study has demonstrated the presence of an extensive plexus of nitric oxide (NO)-synthesizing nerve fibers in this organ.

Valentina Annese, Elena Navarro-Guerrero, Ismael Rodríguez-Prieto and Ricardo Pardal, Physiological Plasticity of Neural-Crest-Derived Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Carotid Body, Cell Reports, 19, Cited by: Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version.

Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : R. Coupland. ALTHOUGH a carotid rete mirabile is present in many mammals, notably the artiodactyla, its function is uncertain. Many workers have suggested that Cited by:. the mammalian carotid body Nikolai Lazarov 1,3, Michail Iliev 2, Dimitrinka Atanasova 3 1 Dept.

of Anatomy, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Sofia.Carotid bodies are the sensory organs for detecting systemic hypoxia and the ensuing reflexes prevent the development of tissue/cellular hypoxia.

Although every mammalian cell responds to hypoxia, O2 Cited by: These results are in line with evidence from the mammalian carotid body, where both nicotinic and P2X2/3 receptors are found at post-synaptic terminals of petrosal neurons and play critical roles.